Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario.

Evaluating critical thinking and problem solving in large classes

Includes bibliographical references. 'This report describes a study to investigate the impact of a MEA-integrated curriculum on critical thinking (CT) development in a first-year engineering course at Queen's University. The course focuses on developing problem solving, modeling and critical thinking skills in part by using complex contextualized problems known as model eliciting activities (MEAs). In addition, the MEAs provide a means for the rigorous, authentic and sustainable course-embedded assessment of the aforementioned skills.

Evaluating critical thinking and problem solving in large classes. Appendicies.

Includes bibliographical references. 'This report describes a study to investigate the impact of a MEA-integrated curriculum on critical thinking (CT) development in a first-year engineering course at Queen's University. The course focuses on developing problem solving, modeling and critical thinking skills in part by using complex contextualized problems known as model eliciting activities (MEAs). In addition, the MEAs provide a means for the rigorous, authentic and sustainable course-embedded assessment of the aforementioned skills.

Hybrid learning in a Canadian college environment

Includes bibliographical references. 'A great deal of research has been conducted and published on the topic of hybrid or 'blended' learning in university settings, but relatively little has been conducted within the college environment. The purpose of this multi-method study was to identify the impact of hybrid course delivery methods on student success and course withdrawal rates, and to evaluate faculty and student experience of hybrid instruction from within the Canadian college environment'--Executive summary.

Hybrid learning in a Canadian college environment. Appendix.

Includes bibliographical references. 'A great deal of research has been conducted and published on the topic of hybrid or 'blended' learning in university settings, but relatively little has been conducted within the college environment. The purpose of this multi-method study was to identify the impact of hybrid course delivery methods on student success and course withdrawal rates, and to evaluate faculty and student experience of hybrid instruction from within the Canadian college environment'--Executive summary.

Intentions for and outcomes following a decade of government investment in graduate education

Includes bibliographical references. 'This summary addresses first the nature of and intentions for the investments, and then key points about changes in enrolments and degrees granted. The investments of interest are those made either in operating funding for universities specifically for graduate enrolment expansion, or in scholarships directly to graduate students. Certainly there have also been major investments in research, which is closely tied to graduate education.

Succeeding with disabilities

Includes bibliographical references. 'The paper, 'Succeeding with Disabilities: Graduates with Disabilities and the Factors Affecting Time-to-Completion', examines the experiences of students with disabilities who graduated from five Ontario colleges between 2007 and 2010. The study uses administrative data from each of the colleges' disability services offices to determine whether students with disabilities took longer to graduate than students without disabilities.

The University of Waterloo and work-integrated learning

Includes bibliographical references. 'This report was requested and partially funded by the University of Waterloo's Centre for the Advancement of Co-operative Education (WATCACE), along with funding from the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario. It presents a customized analysis of findings from three surveys, undertaken in spring 2011 and spring 2012, to gather perspectives from graduating college and university students, postsecondary faculty, and Ontario employers on work-integrated learning (WIL) within a postsecondary program of study.

The University of Waterloo and work-integrated learning. Appendices

Includes bibliographical references. 'This report was requested and partially funded by the University of Waterloo's Centre for the Advancement of Co-operative Education (WATCACE), along with funding from the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario. It presents a customized analysis of findings from three surveys, undertaken in spring 2011 and spring 2012, to gather perspectives from graduating college and university students, postsecondary faculty, and Ontario employers on work-integrated learning (WIL) within a postsecondary program of study.